THE ART OF COLLECTING

CONVERSATIONS WITH COLLECTORS

Pipilotti Rist, Pixelwald (Pixel Forest), 2016. Courtesy the artist, Hauser & Wirth, and Luhring Augustine. Installation photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio, courtesy New Museum.

FROM SAN FRANCISCO TO BEIJING TO BERLIN, WE SPEAK TO THOSE AT THE CUTTING EDGE OF COLLECTING TO FIND OUT WHAT INSPIRES THEM, HOW THEY ARE PURSUING THEIR AMBITIOUS VISIONS, AND WHAT IT TAKES TO BUILD A COLLECTION AT THE FOREFRONT OF TODAY’S EVER-EVOLVING ART AND DESIGN LANDSCAPE



At Muse, the Rolls-Royce Art Programme, we celebrate not only the artists and designers exploring new frontiers within their fields, but also the visionary art collectors who share a passion for pushing boundaries. Here we bring together highlights from our ongoing series of talks with collectors from across the globe – each of whom has carved out their own unique path, but who are united by a spirit of curiosity and innovation.

 

These conversations offer a window into a world of connoisseurship, intuition and individuality. Below, hear from pioneers like Pamela Kramlich, one of the first to create a major collection of media art, and Julia Stoschek, whose moving image collection is the largest of its kind in Europe. Discover what drives these remarkable individuals to create era-defining collections, told through their own words. In future talks, we will also be meeting collectors with a passion for design and craftsmanship.

'These conversations offer a window into a world of connoisseurship, intuition and individuality'

The Enclave, 2012-13. © Richard Mosse, installation video, courtesy of Pamela and Richard Kramlich

LIVING WITH MOVING IMAGE ART




What does living with an art collection look like when your artworks exist as files, rather than tangible objects? How would you display moving image works in your home? Pamela and Richard Kramlich are in a unique position to comment. In 1997, they engaged master architects Herzog & de Meuron to design a residence where they could live side by side with their landmark collection of over 200 video and time-based artworks. The unprecedented, state-of-the-art retreat that resulted was described by the architects as ‘an inhabitable media installation.’ In conversation with curator Theodora Vischer, Pamela Kramlich describes the ground-breaking project, discusses the challenges of preserving moving image art, and explores why truly great artworks in any medium are always timeless.

X Museum, Beijing, External View, Courtesy Weiqi Jin.

THE NEXT-GEN COLLECTOR



Already the co-founder of two major art institutions at 27, Michael Xufu Huang epitomises a next-generation approach to collecting. Effortlessly at home in the digital domain, and unconstrained by borders or boundaries, Huang has forged his own model for the 21st-century art patron and collector. At the helm of Beijing’s X Museum, Huang applies a fresh approach to exhibiting his collection. ‘We're not afraid if a young artist doesn’t have an established career’, he asserts. What matters instead is that the museum is ‘always on track with what's happening, and with what artists are doing.’ Importantly, the collection should reflect Huang’s discerning taste: ‘I definitely have my criteria, an aesthetic. Works need to please me first.’

'Effortlessly at home in the digital domain, and unconstrained by borders or boundaries, Huang has forged his own model for the 21st-century art patron and collector.'

X Museum, Beijing, External View, Courtesy Weiqi Jin.

Julia Stoschek Collection Düsseldorf, foyer, first floor. Photo: Şirin Şimşek, Cologne.

SHARING WHAT MOVES US


For some, the act of building a collection acquires richer meaning when it can be seen and enjoyed by a wider audience. This is a mission that can take many forms but is, at its heart, driven by the innate human desire to share what moves us with others. We gained insights into the art of creating and sharing collections in a wide-ranging conversation between three influential art world figures. Curator Daniel Birnbaum was joined by Julia Stoschek and Han Nefkens, two longstanding collectors of moving image art who have found their own unique ways to share their collections with the world.

'For some, the act of building a collection acquires richer meaning when it can be seen and enjoyed by a wider audience.'

Julia Stoschek, Photo: Şirin Şimşek.

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CONTINUE YOUR JOURNEY

Delve further into stories of Inspiring Greatness.

As moving image art enters a new era of heightened relevance, consistently reflecting our shared experiences, one of the main inspirations for the Dream Commission, so we look back to the humble origins of the medium to see how it has evolved from experimental novelty to a futuristic mainstay of contemporary art.

A Brief History Of Moving Image Art: Part I

As moving image art enters a new era of heightened relevance, consistently reflecting our shared experiences, one of the main inspirations for the Dream Commission, so we look back to the humble origins of the medium to see how it has evolved from experimental novelty to a futuristic mainstay of contemporary art.

By the time of the Millennium, moving image art had infiltrated the art world. Artists like Pipilotti Rist and Bill Viola were becoming household names, Rist’s lavish large-scale installations and Viola’s theatrical ‘total environments’ had proven how moving image art works could create transfixing experiences that could extend beyond the screen.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF MOVING IMAGE ART: PART II

By the time of the Millennium, moving image art had infiltrated the art world. Artists like Pipilotti Rist and Bill Viola were becoming household names, Rist’s lavish large-scale installations and Viola’s theatrical ‘total environments’ had proven how moving image art works could create transfixing experiences that could extend beyond the screen.

We explore the innovative work of the dream commission winner, who has gained critical acclaim for arresting visual displays that harness digital technology to explore themes including identity, memory, and longing.

Winners Dream Commission: Life In Dreams

We explore the innovative work of the dream commission winner, who has gained critical acclaim for arresting visual displays that harness digital technology to explore themes including identity, memory, and longing.